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Siemens to supply further power plant equipment to Belarus

The six SGT-800 industrial gas turbines, like the five machines of the same type that Siemens is supplying for the Vitebsk region, will increase the grid’s reliability and flexibility and support the transition to a new energy mix in Belarus. Commissioning is scheduled for December 2021

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Siemens, SGT-800 gas turbine

Siemens has received another order from Belarus to supply equipment for a peak load power plant. The order was placed by the state-run energy provider RUE Minskenergo.

The six SGT-800 industrial gas turbines, like the five machines of the same type that Siemens is supplying for the Vitebsk region, will increase the grid’s reliability and flexibility and support the transition to a new energy mix in Belarus. Commissioning is scheduled for December 2021.

The six gas turbines will be deployed in a new gas power plant in Minsk, which will ensure grid stability and reliable power supply in the Republic of Belarus.

The plant’s electrical capacity, which is designed for 700 operating hours and 350 cold starts per year, will be 300 megawatts. This capacity can be made available in as little as 15 minutes after a cold start.

“We chose to go with Siemens machines, since they offer excellent performance and can be brought to full load in a very short period of time,” said Aleh Shchemel, general director of Minskenergo. “This makes these turbines an outstanding choice for increasing grid stability and supply security in Belarus.”

Olaf Kreyenberg, head of Power Generation Europe and CIS at Siemens Gas and Power, said: “We are also helping the country advance its decarbonisation efforts. The intelligent combination of efficient and flexible gas turbines with wind and solar power plants makes it possible to cut significant quantities of greenhouse emissions.”

According to Nastassia Bekish, the executive director of the Green Network, an environmental NGO, the Belarusian government’s long-term strategy for decarbonising the country’s economy by 2050 and its nationwide adaptation plan have not yet been developed, even though both of these strategic documents were expected to be ready by 2019. Deadlines have now been shifted three years, she told Emerging Europe in January.

Belarus lags behind the rest of the Eastern Partnership countries, such as Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine, in terms of climate diplomacy, which resulted in the country dropping in the annual Climate Change Performance Index (CCPI) by 11 points in 2019.

Of 57 countries, Belarus was ranked 40th and the lowest in emerging Europe in the CCPI, published by Germanwatch, the New Climate Institute and the Climate Action Network (CAN).

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